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Three Varieties of Holiday Cactus and How to Care for Them

Named for the time of year the blooms appear, three holiday cactus varieties include Thanksgiving cactus, Christmas cactus, and Easter cactus. All three are easy to grow and have similar growth habits and care requirements. These familiar cacti are traditionally available in shades of red, but they also come in magenta, pink, and scarlet. You can also find yellow, white, orange, purple, salmon, and apricot varieties. All are native to Brazil; Thanksgiving and Christmas cactus being tropical rain forest plants, and Easter cactus native to Brazil’s natural forests.
The Christmas cactusis a very popular houseplant—and for good reason! When they bloom, they produce colorful, tubular flowers in pink or lilac colors. Their beautiful flowers, long bloom time, and easy care requirements make them a wonderful plant. We’ll bet someone in your family has a Christmas cactus!

Because of their beautiful flowers and fascinating stems, they’re commonly given as gifts around the holidays. Because they’re also easy to propagate, you can enjoy watching them grow into plants you can keep giving from year to year. information that will keep you growing and giving away these plants for a lifetime.


Identifying Holiday Varieties

Obviously, holiday cacti are primarily recognized by the time in which they bloom. Thanksgiving cactus blooms in late autumn, about a month before Christmas cactus. Easter cactus displays buds in February and blooms around Easter.

Holiday cacti are also differentiated by the shape of their leaves, which are, in reality, plump, flat stems. Thanksgiving cactus, often known as lobster cactus, has hooked leaves with a claw-like appearance. Christmas cactus leaves are smaller with smooth edges. Easter cactus leaves are characterized by a bristled appearance.

Unlike regular, desert-dwelling cactus, holiday cacti are not drought-tolerant. As with other common houseplants, during active growth, water them whenever the potting soil feels dry to the touch. Drainage is critical and the pots should never stand in water.

When your holiday cactus has flowered, water it sparingly until it completes its normal dormant period and new growth appears. Easter cactus isn’t a tropical plant, so a period of relative dryness is especially important. Holiday cacti varieties prefer dark nights and relatively cool temperatures between 50 and 65 degrees F. (10-18 C.). They’re easy to propagate by breaking off a stem with two to five segments.

To get a new plant from your cactus, set the stem/cutting aside until the broken end forms a callus, then plant it in a pot filled with a mixture of sand and sterile potting mix. The pot needs a drainage hole in the bottom, or you’ll find the stem is likely to rot before it develops roots.

The Subtle Differences Between Holiday Cacti

Did you know that there are Easter, Thanksgiving, AND Christmas cacti? Here are the main differences between these holiday cacti—plus, tips on how to care for your holiday cactus to keep it blooming.

Holiday cacti such as the Christmas cactus, Thanksgiving cactus, and Easter cactus are hybrids of Brazilian forest cacti. The holiday designations reflect when the different cacti bloom in North America!

Thanksgiving and Christmas cacti are members of the genus Schlumbergera, while the Easter cactus is in the genus Rhipsalidopsis, which grows in drier forests. 

Christmas Cactus

Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii) is the long-lived plant our grandmothers grew. I have a plant that came from one my mother-in-law grew from a cutting she received over 70 years ago! They are the ultimate pass-along plant since they are so easy to root. Just pinch off a “Y” shaped piece from one of the branches and stick it in a pot of sterile soil or vermiculite. It will root in no time.

Thanksgiving Cactus

Thanksgiving cactus (Schlumbergera truncata) typically blooms between mid-November and late December, sometimes through January. Its leaf segments are square shaped with pointed hooks on one end and along the sides like pincers, giving rise to its common name “crab cactus.” It is native to Brazil, where its 2 to 3 inch long, satiny flowers are pollinated by hummingbirds.

Easter Cactus

If you find that your holiday cactus has spring flowers, it may very well be an Easter cactus (Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri) blooms in late winter and spring, often from March until May. 

Also called a “Spring Cactus,” the Easter Cactus has flaring, trumpet-shaped flowers with pointy petals which are usually pink, but can also come in red, orange, and other cherry colors. Their star-shaped petals open at sunrise and close at sunset and last for several weeks. They bear flat succulent leaf segments.

More Ways to Tell a Christmas Cactus from a Thanksgiving Cactus

Many of the plants available for sale are hybrid crosses of Christmas and Thanksgiving cacti (Schlumbergera x buckleyi) that come in a rainbow of exotic colors including orange, purple, yellow, red, pink, white, and two-tones.

Look at their bloom color and the way the flower blooms:

  • The Christmas cactus has hanging flowers in shades of magenta and blooms, of course, near Christmas. The range of flowering is late November through early February.
  • The Thanksgiving cactus has flowers that face outwards and the plant comes in a wide range of colors. This plant blooms nearer to Thanksgiving than the Christmas cactus. It can start flowering in very late October or in November.

They also have different stems:

  • The true Christmas cactus has a flattened stem segments with smooth, scalloped edges.
  • The Thanksgiving cactus has a very toothy stem with two to four pointed teeth.
  • While the Christmas cactus stems hang down like a pendent, the Thanksgiving cactus has stems that grow upright at first and then arch.

Most nurseries and stores actually sell the Thanksgiving cactus (not Christmas cactus) because it blooms around American Thanksgiving. Additionally, the Christmas cactus is more difficult to ship as the stems are more fragile and often break.

Note: For simplicity’s sake, we refer to all three of these species as “Christmas cactus” on this page, since this is the most commonly used term and our care advice applies to all of them!

How To Care For a Christmas Cactus, Thanksgiving Cactus, or Easter Cactus

About Christmas Cacti

Unlike other cacti, the Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera x buckleyi) and its relatives don’t live in hot, arid environments such as deserts or plains. In fact, these epiphytic succulents are native to the tropical rainforests of southern Brazil, where they grow on tree branches and soak up the high humidity, dappled sunlight, and warm temperatures.

The bottom line: Don’t treat a Christmas cactus like it’s a run-of-the-mill cactus or succulent. They can’t take the same sort of sunny, dry conditions that other cacti can. It’s important to water these cacti more regularly than most succulents, but to also be cautious of keeping them too wet. (See detailed care instructions below.)

Thanksgiving, Easter, or Christmas Cactus?

There are three main types of “holiday” cacti out there: the Easter cactus (S. gaertneri), Thanksgiving cactus (S. truncata), and Christmas cactus (S. x buckleyi). Each holiday cactus typically blooms closest to the holiday that it’s named after. However, most of the “Christmas cacti” sold today are actually Thanksgiving cacti, which tend to bloom from November through February and therefore pass unnoticed as Christmas cacti. To learn more, see our article on the different types of holiday cacti and how to tell them apart.

Planting

Potting Christmas Cacti

  • When selecting a pot for a Christmas cactus, be sure to choose one that has a drainage hole in the bottom. This helps to keep the soil from getting too wet.
  • Christmas cacti grow well in most potting mixes that are formulated for succulents. The important thing is that your potting soil drains well.

Where to Put a Christmas Cactus

  • Plants should be kept in bright, indirect light. An east-facing window or a bright bathroom is ideal. Too much direct sunlight can bleach the sensitive leaves.
  • A daytime temperature of 70°F (21°C) and an evening temperature of 60-65°F (15-18°C) is preferred.
  • Christmas cacti prefer a more humid environment, which makes a bright bathroom or kitchen a good spot to keep them.
  • In the summer, Christmas cacti can be placed in a shady spot in the garden or in an unheated porch until temperatures get below 50°F (10°C). Keep them out of direct outdoor sunlight.

Growing

How to Care for Christmas Cacti

  • Plan to water every 2-3 weeks, but only water when the top one third of soil feels dry to the touch. For example, if the plant is in 6 inches of soil, water when the top 2 inches feel dry. (Use your finger to check!)
    • When the soil is sufficiently dry, soak the soil until water runs through the pot’s drainage holes. Place a tray underneath the pot to catch the water. After 10-15 minutes, discard any excess water in the tray so that the pot doesn’t sit in water.
    • It’s especially important to water well while the plant is flowering.
  • From spring through early fall, feed every 2 weeks with a balanced houseplant fertilizer. During the fall and winter, feed the cactus monthly to encourage successful blooming.
  • Prune plants in late spring to encourage branching and more flowers. Simply cut off a few sections of each stem; the plant will branch from the wound.
    • If you wish, place the cut pieces in a lightly moist potting soil—they root easily after a few weeks and make for excellent Christmas presents!

How to Get Your Christmas Cactus to Bloom

The blooms of Christmas cacti and its relatives are triggered by the cooler temperatures and longer nights of fall. The three main types of holiday cacti generally bloom according to this schedule:

  • Thanksgiving cacti are the earliest and longest bloomers, typically producing flowers from late fall through mid-winter.
  • Christmas cacti tend to bloom from early winter to mid-winter.
  • Easter cacti bloom from late winter to mid-spring.

If your cactus is not blooming, it may be receiving too much light or too-high temperatures. Here are some tips to encourage yours to produce flowers!

  • To trigger blooming, nights need to be at least 14 hours long and days between 8 to 10 hours for at least six weeks. If you have strong indoor lighting that’s on at night, you may need to cover your cactus or move it to an area that’s exposed to the natural light cycle.
  • Flower buds form best when the plant is kept in temperatures between 50 and 60°F (10 and 15°C).
    • You can kickstart the budding process by exposing the plant to temperatures of about 45°F (7°C) for several nights in a row.
  • Make sure that you are consistent with watering while the plant is in flower. If the plant dries out too much, it may drop its buds.
  • If the cactus sheds its buds one winter, don’t worry: it should bloom the following year!

Recommended Varieties

There are three main types of “holiday cacti” available:

  • Thanksgiving cacti (Schlumbergera truncata) bloom from late fall to mid-winter and are often mislabeled as Christmas cacti.
  • Christmas cacti (S. x buckleyi) bloom from early winter to mid-winter.
  • Easter cacti (S. gaertneri) bloom from later winter to mid-spring.

Wit and Wisdom

  • When the buds of a Christmas cactus look as if they’re about to open, make sure you water the plant regularly and keep it cool.
  • Late spring is the best time to propagate cuttings because most holiday cacti emerge from their winter rest and initiate new growth.

Pests/Diseases

Blossom drop: If your Christmas cactus is exposed to any type of stress, the plant will likely drop its blossoms. This could be related to the amount of light, or a sudden change in temperature, as discussed in above plant care section. Also, ensure that your soil doesn’t get too dry while buds are forming.

The plant may be susceptible to mealy bugs and, if over-watered, root rot. If you have problems, cut out infected areas and repot in clean soil.

Old story
Advice For Christmas Cactus Care START HERE

Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii) is a popular, winter-flowering houseplant that makes a great addition to nearly any indoor setting. How to Plant Christmas Cactus The Christmas cactus is easily propagated by cutting a short Y-shaped segment from the stem tips.

Three Tips for Thanksgiving Cactus Care

Christmas and Thanksgiving cacti are known as Schlumbergera truncata. It is called a leaf cactus but is not a true cactus. Rather it is an epiphyte, those plants which live on other plants. The leaves are broad and flat with slight serrations on the edges. They have blooms that last for 2 to 4 months and have an easy-going nature.

Forcing Blooms Thanksgiving cacti need to be fooled in order to bloom again the next year. Forcing Thanksgiving cactus to bloom requires cool temperatures and shorter daylight hours. That means if you live in a region with no frost, you can leave the cactus outside to experience what naturally occurs. If you live where temperatures get cold, you’ll have to create false conditions indoors to protect them from the cold but can experience cool temps down to 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 C.) and reduced light, including artificial light.

Watering Properly Start forcing Thanksgiving cactus to bloom in late summer to early fall. The most obvious plant care tip for Thanksgiving cactus is water. These are tropical plants and should not be allowed to dry out. However, as with any common house plant, excess water at the roots can cause rotting and fungal issues. As an epiphyte, it often has exposed roots and gathers most of its moisture through humidity in the air. Remember that potted plants need well-draining soil and good drainage. Water your cactus thoroughly, then allow the top 1/3 of soil to dry out before watering again.

Taking Cuttings These plants are easy to propagate and multiply. Snip off a stem with 4 to 5 sections and leaves. Dust the end with fungicide and allow it to callus for a week in a dry location. Fill a small clay pot with vermiculite or perlite mixed with potting soil. Alternatively, you can use damp sand.

Push the callused end into the mixture and place the pot in bright but indirect light. Tent over the cutting with a plastic bag and remove it for an hour each day to let in air. In approximately three  weeks, the cutting will have rooted, and you will have a brand new plant. Thanksgiving cacti take up to a couple years to get to the blooming stage.

Caring For Your Holiday Cactus

The holiday cactus is not your typical cactus. We are all familiar with the desert cactus but the holiday plant is a forest cactus—an epiphyte that lives in decomposing leaf litter found in the forks and on the branches of trees in tropical rain forests of South America.

  • The conditions in our houses are nothing like their native rainforest homes, but still they do fine in normal household temperatures of 65° to 70°F, with a drop at night to 55° to 60°F. They will need protection when temperatures drop below 40°F.
  • They like their forest floor, so give these cacti acidic, well-draining soils. Use a cactus mix and add perlite, vermiculite, and orchid bark.
  • They like bright light but not direct sun; an east or west window is perfect. If the leaves turn yellow it means they are getting too much light. If put outdoors in the warmer months, keep them under a shade tree or patio. Not in full sun.
  • Let the plants dry out between waterings by watering them when the top 2 inches of the soil feels dry. Do not over water; this is the number one reason for their demise in our homes. Neglect is better than over watering! You could get a hydrometer to help you know when to water. Don’t let them sit in water because if they get too waterlogged they will rot!
  • Misting the plants frequently helps increase humidity.
  • Optional: Fertilize them with an all-purpose fertilizer such as a Miracle Grow Tomato water-soluble fertilizer (1 tablespoon to a gallon of non-chlorinated water). Feed 2 times a month while the plant is actively growing (usually spring and summer).

How to Keep Holiday Cactus Blooming

The keys to getting your holiday cactus to blossom are short days and cool nights. They need 13 hours of darkness and nights at 50° to 55°F for at least 1 to 2 months before they will set buds. I put some of my plants outside all summer and wait until the nights start to drop below 50°F before bringing them in for the fall and winter. They usually bud right up and start to bloom after that. The plants that grow in my kitchen get no special treatment and they blossom just as well. Go figure!

The plants flower best when slightly potbound so only repot them if they are really crowded. Unlike many holiday plants, they are non-toxic to cats and dogs, so don’t be afraid to bring one home for the holidays!

^^^^^ How To Care For a Christmas Cactus, Thanksgiving Cactus, or Easter Cactus

About Christmas Cacti

Unlike other cacti, the Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera x buckleyi) and its relatives don’t live in hot, arid environments such as deserts or plains. In fact, these epiphytic succulents are native to the tropical rainforests of southern Brazil, where they grow on tree branches and soak up the high humidity, dappled sunlight, and warm temperatures.

The bottom line: Don’t treat a Christmas cactus like it’s a run-of-the-mill cactus or succulent. They can’t take the same sort of sunny, dry conditions that other cacti can. It’s important to water these cacti more regularly than most succulents, but to also be cautious of keeping them too wet. (See detailed care instructions below.)

Thanksgiving, Easter, or Christmas Cactus?

There are three main types of “holiday” cacti out there: the Easter cactus (S. gaertneri), Thanksgiving cactus (S. truncata), and Christmas cactus (S. x buckleyi). Each holiday cactus typically blooms closest to the holiday that it’s named after. However, most of the “Christmas cacti” sold today are actually Thanksgiving cacti, which tend to bloom from November through February and therefore pass unnoticed as Christmas cacti. To learn more, see our article on the different types of holiday cacti and how to tell them apart.

Planting

Potting Christmas Cacti

  • When selecting a pot for a Christmas cactus, be sure to choose one that has a drainage hole in the bottom. This helps to keep the soil from getting too wet.
  • Christmas cacti grow well in most potting mixes that are formulated for succulents. The important thing is that your potting soil drains well.

Where to Put a Christmas Cactus

  • Plants should be kept in bright, indirect light. An east-facing window or a bright bathroom is ideal. Too much direct sunlight can bleach the sensitive leaves.
  • A daytime temperature of 70°F (21°C) and an evening temperature of 60-65°F (15-18°C) is preferred.
  • Christmas cacti prefer a more humid environment, which makes a bright bathroom or kitchen a good spot to keep them.
  • In the summer, Christmas cacti can be placed in a shady spot in the garden or in an unheated porch until temperatures get below 50°F (10°C). Keep them out of direct outdoor sunlight.

Growing

How to Care for Christmas Cacti

  • Plan to water every 2-3 weeks, but only water when the top one third of soil feels dry to the touch. For example, if the plant is in 6 inches of soil, water when the top 2 inches feel dry. (Use your finger to check!)
    • When the soil is sufficiently dry, soak the soil until water runs through the pot’s drainage holes. Place a tray underneath the pot to catch the water. After 10-15 minutes, discard any excess water in the tray so that the pot doesn’t sit in water.
    • It’s especially important to water well while the plant is flowering.
  • From spring through early fall, feed every 2 weeks with a balanced houseplant fertilizer. During the fall and winter, feed the cactus monthly to encourage successful blooming.
  • Prune plants in late spring to encourage branching and more flowers. Simply cut off a few sections of each stem; the plant will branch from the wound.
    • If you wish, place the cut pieces in a lightly moist potting soil—they root easily after a few weeks and make for excellent Christmas presents!

How to Get Your Christmas Cactus to Bloom

The blooms of Christmas cacti and its relatives are triggered by the cooler temperatures and longer nights of fall. The three main types of holiday cacti generally bloom according to this schedule:

  • Thanksgiving cacti are the earliest and longest bloomers, typically producing flowers from late fall through mid-winter.
  • Christmas cacti tend to bloom from early winter to mid-winter.
  • Easter cacti bloom from late winter to mid-spring.

If your cactus is not blooming, it may be receiving too much light or too-high temperatures. Here are some tips to encourage yours to produce flowers!

  • To trigger blooming, nights need to be at least 14 hours long and days between 8 to 10 hours for at least six weeks. If you have strong indoor lighting that’s on at night, you may need to cover your cactus or move it to an area that’s exposed to the natural light cycle.
  • Flower buds form best when the plant is kept in temperatures between 50 and 60°F (10 and 15°C).
    • You can kickstart the budding process by exposing the plant to temperatures of about 45°F (7°C) for several nights in a row.
  • Make sure that you are consistent with watering while the plant is in flower. If the plant dries out too much, it may drop its buds.
  • If the cactus sheds its buds one winter, don’t worry: it should bloom the following year!

Recommended Varieties

There are three main types of “holiday cacti” available:

  • Thanksgiving cacti (Schlumbergera truncata) bloom from late fall to mid-winter and are often mislabeled as Christmas cacti.
  • Christmas cacti (S. x buckleyi) bloom from early winter to mid-winter.
  • Easter cacti (S. gaertneri) bloom from later winter to mid-spring.

Wit and Wisdom

  • When the buds of a Christmas cactus look as if they’re about to open, make sure you water the plant regularly and keep it cool.
  • Late spring is the best time to propagate cuttings because most holiday cacti emerge from their winter rest and initiate new growth.

Pests/Diseases

Blossom drop: If your Christmas cactus is exposed to any type of stress, the plant will likely drop its blossoms. This could be related to the amount of light, or a sudden change in temperature, as discussed in above plant care section. Also, ensure that your soil doesn’t get too dry while buds are forming.

The plant may be susceptible to mealy bugs and, if over-watered, root rot. If you have problems, cut out infected areas and repot in clean soil.

Old story
Advice For Christmas Cactus Care START HERE

Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii) is a popular, winter-flowering houseplant that makes a great addition to nearly any indoor setting. How to Plant Christmas Cactus The Christmas cactus is easily propagated by cutting a short Y-shaped segment from the stem tips. Make certain, however, that the cutting is taken from healthy plant foliage only. Plant the segment approximately a quarter of its length deep in slightly sandy soil. Moisten it evenly and place the cutting in a well-lit area, staying away from any direct sunlight. To root cuttings for new plants, cut back shoots from the tips, cut at the second joint of each tip. let it callous over for a few days. The cutting should show signs of growth within a few weeks, at which time the plant can be transferred to another container, if desired, with a looser potting soil mix of compost, loam and sand. The plant is happiest with a soil pH balance of 5.5 to 6.2.

How to Care for Christmas Cactus Advice for Christmas cactus care tells us that it performs well under average home conditions with moderate care. The Christmas cactus will adapt to low light conditions, but the plant will produce blooms more readily if exposed to brighter light. That being said, too much direct sunlight can burn its leaves, so keep the Christmas cactus in an appropriate area to avoid this. Christmas cactus moisture is important as well. The plant requires frequent and thorough watering, during its active growth in spring and summer, keeping the soil slightly moist. Allow Christmas cactus moisture levels to drop and dry out some between watering intervals, but never completely, and never let the plant sit in water, as this will lead to root and stem rot. Applying a mild houseplant fertilizer solution every other week is also acceptable.

When considering how to care for Christmas cactus, keep in mind it also prefers temperatures hovering between 60 and 70 degrees F. (15-21 C.) with average to high humidity levels. Placing a tray of pebbles filled with water beneath the Christmas cactus container is a good way to add more humidity to the home.. You can help to maintain its bud set by adequate watering, avoid exposure to cold drafts, unvented heaters, or rough handling. Night temperatures above 70 degrees F may inhibit bud development.

After Flowering Once the Christmas cactus has ceased all flowering (usually by fall), or about six to eight weeks before you want the plant to rebloom, you should allow the plant to begin its dormancy cycle by cutting back on moisture and reducing both light and temperature. After blooming, these plants like shorter days and cooler nights. The plant goes into active growth once it has finished blooming. Simply cut back the watering and make sure the plant receives 12-14 hours of darkness and average temperatures around 50-55 F. (10-12 C.). Also, keep the Christmas cactus away from drafty areas and avoid sudden changes in moisture, temperature or sunlight.

Possible Issues If your beautiful plant doesn’t produce many blossoms or it begins to drop its buds, there could be a few reasons. Try providing it with 13 straight hours of nighttime darkness. If there has been a sudden drop in temperature, the Christmas cactus may react by withholding blooms or dropping them. Mealy bugs, aphids and scale are occasional visitors, but can be gently wiped away with a soft cloth or swab, dipped in alcohol.

How To Care For Easter Cactus Houseplants

Hybridization has given us a host of beautiful and unusual plants to choose from when decorating our homes. The cactus family is a perfect example of the spectrum of plants available. The holiday plants, such as the Christmas cactus and Easter cactus, are the hybrids of the Brazilian forest cactus. These segmented plants bloom at certain times of the year, which gives them the holiday designations.

What is the Difference Between a Christmas Cactus and an Easter Cactus? The Thanksgiving and Christmas cacti are members of the Schlumbergera family, while the Easter cactus is in the Rhipsalidopsis family. The Thanksgiving and Christmas cacti hail from Brazilian rainforests while the Easter cactus is from drier forests. Christmas cactus blooms around the winter holidays. The Easter cactus plant blooms late winter to early spring. Both types have flattened stems, called segments, which are lightly serrated on the edges. The segments are actually the leaves of the plant. About Easter Cactus Plant The Easter cactus plant (Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri) comes in a variety of bloom colors. Usually they are in bloom at the time of purchase and are common holiday gifts. Flower tones range from white to red, orange, peach, lavender and pink. Even following its bloom, the plant has an interesting appeal in its unusual shape. The segments are added onto by new growth, creating a rickety stacked appearance. The plant doesn’t have the same spines as a desert cactus, but a more undulating form with softer pointed nodes on the edges of the leaves. Getting an Easter cactus to bloom the next year requires a special set of conditions which amount to a form of neglect. How to Care for Easter Cactus These plants perform best in bright light, but not direct sunlight. Unlike desert cacti, they need cooler temperatures, even during the day, and will bloom for months in nighttime temperatures of 55 to 60 degrees F. (13-16 C.). Keep the soil lightly moist and allow it to dry out before watering again. Good Easter cactus care means repotting the plant every two years in spring. The plants enjoy being pot bound, but give it new soil and return the plant to the same pot. Fertilize monthly after the bloom period with a 10-10-10 or food with a low nitrogen count. Provide some humidity if your home is dry. Place the plant on a saucer filled with pebbles and a little water. The evaporation will moisten the air around the plant. Getting an Easter Cactus to Bloom If you followed your Easter cactus care faithfully, you should have a healthy green cactus. These delightful plants actually need cool temperatures and long nights to set buds. To accomplish flowers, you must be a little rude to them. First stop feeding them. Then move the plant where it has 12 to 14 hours of darkness. Best bud set occurs when temperatures are 50 degrees F, (10 C.). Water sparingly from October to November. By December, you can move the plant somewhere warmer with a 60 to 65 degree range (16-18 C.). The plant should flower in February to March.